A Phoenix Yet in Flames, 2016 (detail)

Embroidery on mixed material

“I make visual narratives through embroidery, exploring human relationships, and feelings of love, fear, belonging, betrayal and tragedy. I’m inspired by the Celtic mythologies of my Welsh roots, in particular the collection of tales from ‘The Mabinogion’. These medieval fables were passed down through oral tradition, and include enchanting stories where people are turned into animals, and where love treads close to death and tragedy.

Embroidery and textiles are imbued with connotations of homeliness and domesticity, and have emotive qualities relating to memories of people and comfort. In my work, I channel the stories from my own life into textile narratives, pulling on the themes and styles of the medieval cyfarwydd (‘storyteller’). I am interested in the connection people have with animals, and the way we find comfort in their company, and I often use animals as metaphors and as a way of representing emotions. Using embroidery techniques, I stitch together the stories of my own life, depicting the stillness of an emotion in a moment in time.

I embroider using a free-hand Irish sewing machine, a specialist technique with a machine that ceased production in the 1950s.”

 

Rhiannon was born in Cardiff, attending a Welsh-speaking school in Llantrisant where she was immersed in Welsh culture, singing in the local choir and competing in the annual Eisteddfod. She remembers the excitement of hearing stories of her namesake, the horse goddess Rhiannon, in the Welsh fables of Y Mabinogion. She lost the Welsh language when her family relocated to Herefordshire, where she currently resides.

Rhiannon graduated from University College Falmouth in 2011 with a first class BA (Hons) in Textiles and in 2014 with an MA in Textiles from the Royal College of Art. In 2011, she received a Texprint award for the top 24 textiles graduates in the UK, exhibiting in Paris as part of Première Vision. Since, she has worked in fashion studios in London, New York and Stockholm as a textiles designer, where she developed her love of pattern and embellishment. Rhiannon was awarded the Worshipful Company of Needlemakers Scholarship in 2014.

In 2015, she was commissioned by Hampshire Council to produce a large scale WW1 memorial embroidery, permanently displayed in Whitchurch Town Hall. Other recent exhibitions include Made By Hand, Cardiff City Hall 2016, Act Up World Aids Day, Hackney Picturehouse (in collaboration with Faye Oakenfull) 2014, Portal, Llantarnam Grange, 2014, Show, RCA Battersea 2014, New Visuality, According to McGee, York 2011

In Another Light (Detail)
Sheepskin parchment, white gold, monofilament

“This is a work about memory, time and almost imperceptible but unstoppable change. The holes are seared into gilded sheepskin parchment before being cut out and threaded onto monofilament to create a delicate mass of barely there substance. A hole cannot exist without the material that frames it, and the work is as much about absence as it is about presence. Time is key, in the making of the work, but also, the white gold will slowly and subtly tarnish and change over time. This is the second in a series of works, over-archingly called ‘Nothing is Something’. The works are an expression of fragmentation and of unified separate moments that reflect something of the human condition, as well as the artist’s concern with ‘the impossibility of things remaining the same”.

 

Soft Target

Kidsilk Haze yarn

One in a series of 13 hand crafted pom pom targets.

Word play and language have often informed and inspired work, as have the choice, transformation and placement of materials to draw out meaning.  Soft Target is a play on words that acknowledges Claus Oldenburg’s soft sculptures.  The pompom is one of the first low craft objects that children learn to make. ‘Soft Target’ serves as a comment on the vulnerable, especially children during a military or terrorist attack.”

 

Philippa Lawrence was born in Louth, Lincolnshire. She graduated from Norwich School of Art with a 1st Class (hons) Degree in Fine Art in 1990. After graduating she did a residency at Gresham’s School, Holt to fund her MA in Printmaking at the Royal College of Art (1991-1993). She is Principal Lecturer on ‘Artist, Designer: Maker’ at Cardiff School of Art & Design, Cardiff Metropolitan University. She lives and works in Bristol with a studio at Spike Island.

Her practice is diverse, embracing land and environmental art, the use of textiles in a fine art context, and the relationship between art, craft and design.  Since 2003 her practice has been primarily site-responsive, concerned with issues related to human relationships to land, nature and place. Issues revolve around: boundaries, land use, land ownership, an increasing concern with imposed limitations, and an encroachment on humankind’s wild spaces – both the public and geographic and the private and psychological. Materials and process are equally important to her as is a consideration of the multiple sites we occupy.

Work pivots on material exploration, drawing out a material’s ability to carry metaphor and speak of human experience, and in a positioning of elements to assist an understanding of site and a re-activation of space. Trained in Fine Art Printmaking at Norwich School of Art and the Royal College of Art Philippa maintains an interest in the language of making, in the multiple and in process.

Philippa works on site-specific projects, commissions and exhibitions. She has exhibited widely both in the UK and internationally, including America, Japan, Czech Republic, Canada, Iceland and Australia. Notable exhibitions include ‘Angles of Incidence’ through AiRx and the British Council, at Singapore Botanic Gardens and at Inner Temple London (2014), ‘Encounters at the Edge of the Forest’, (2014) Chicago, USA, ‘Cloth & Memory {2} (2013) Salts Mill, Saltaire, ‘Bite-Size’ at the Daiwa Anglo Foundation and subsequent tour to Japan (2012) and commissions for Waddesdon Manor (2013-4), ‘Darning the Land: Seam’ at Church Gresley, Derbyshire (2011) for re:place, ‘Bound V-57’ for ‘Nature Unframed’ at Morton Arboretum, Lisle, USA (2011) and for Meadow Art Gallery ‘Barcode FB:814’, (2011) and ‘Tell it to the Trees’ at Croft Castle, Herefordshire (2009-10).

Recent awards made to the artist include Cardiff Metropolitan University Seed Funding (2015) to examine threatened crafts and HEFCW SIP funding (2011) to work with Waddesdon Manor.

 

She is currently working on a series of projects for Hestercombe House, Taunton.

Saturday 7 October 2017, 1 – 4pm

Join lecturer, researcher and maker Angela Maddock for a practical workshop inspired by the processes and discoveries during her residency at the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at King’s College, London.

Participants are encouraged to bring along something knitted or woven that is holed, worn or threadbare for repair. You will learn two methods of visible mending – weave and swiss darning and through discussion and making, explore acts of regeneration and repair, of making good but not always perfect.

Cost: £25 includes materials and  please bring something  to mend

Booking Essential 01267 222775

Suitable for age 16+

Saturday 7 October 2017, 11 am

Angela Maddock is a lecturer, researcher and maker who’s work celebrates the tactile and explores the properties, qualities and tensions of emotional and physical intimacy.

Maddock is a PhD by practice researcher in the School of Material at the Royal College of Art, where she is also a visiting tutor in textiles. As maker in residence 2016-17 at the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at King’s College, London she explored parallels between clinical practices and skills associated with textile making.

Admission Free

Gallery talk by Lucille Junkere

Friday 18 August 2017, 7pm

Lucille Junkere returns to the gallery to talk about her indigo dyeing journey since her residency at the William Morris Gallery. She recently travelled to Nigeria through a Winston Churchill Fellowship where she studied indigo dyeing techniques amongst Yoruba artisans. Àdíre is the Yoruba word for the resist dyed cloth made in Yoruba towns in Nigeria. The textile functions both as an aesthetic expression and a means of communication, offering a deep insight into Yoruba religion, culture, folklore and history. Her talk with be illustrated with short videos, photography, music and Lucille’s own indigo work.

Admission Free

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