Saturday 7 October 2017, 11 am

Angela Maddock is a lecturer, researcher and maker who’s work celebrates the tactile and explores the properties, qualities and tensions of emotional and physical intimacy.

Maddock is a PhD by practice researcher in the School of Material at the Royal College of Art, where she is also a visiting tutor in textiles. As maker in residence 2016-17 at the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at King’s College, London she explored parallels between clinical practices and skills associated with textile making.

Admission Free

Gallery talk by Lucille Junkere

Friday 18 August 2017, 7pm

Lucille Junkere returns to the gallery to talk about her indigo dyeing journey since her residency at the William Morris Gallery. She recently travelled to Nigeria through a Winston Churchill Fellowship where she studied indigo dyeing techniques amongst Yoruba artisans. Àdíre is the Yoruba word for the resist dyed cloth made in Yoruba towns in Nigeria. The textile functions both as an aesthetic expression and a means of communication, offering a deep insight into Yoruba religion, culture, folklore and history. Her talk with be illustrated with short videos, photography, music and Lucille’s own indigo work.

Admission Free

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Llygad y ffynnon (The source)

Ink and threads on plastic (detail)

“My instinct has always been to embrace both painting and embroidery traditions without having to conform to either. I feel a huge sense of freedom in this chosen area. While the act of drawing is central to my practice, I delight in the raw beauty of all my materials – whether they are fabric, thread, paint, paper or plastic.

The recent works on plastic challenge me in terms of scale, technique and emotional content. I relish the sense of theatre whilst working on the inked–up sheets of plastic. It is an intensely physical and gestural process – always concerned with balance and rhythm and expressive mark-making. A form of choreography and personal mapmaking which celebrates landscape, language and womanhood.

This is a landscape layered with ambiguous messages, a place with its own distinct edge…”

Eleri Mills was born in Mid-Wales and gained her BA from Manchester Polytechnic in 1977. In 2000 she was made an Elected Member of the Royal Cambrian Academy and was accepted to the honorary order of the Gorsedd white robe at the National Eisteddfod of Wales in 2004. She was 2010/11 Winner of the Creative Wales Ambassador Award, Arts Council of Wales.

Eleri Mills has exhibited her work widely across Wales, the UK and internationally and is represented by the Thackeray Gallery in London and Martin Tinney Gallery in Cardiff.

Significant exhibitions have included ‘Window on Wales’, Ruthin Craft Centre 2013; Macy Art Gallery, New York 2012; Art of the Stitch (Birmingham, Krefeld and Budapest tour) 2008; Meaning of the land Interceltic Festival, Lorient, France (Representing Wales) 2002; Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh 2001; Piel de Seda Embroidered Bookbindings Museo Nacional de Artes Decorativas, Madrid 1998; Museu Textil i d’Indumentaria, Barcelona (Wales in Catalonia Festival) and UK tour 1995; British Needlework National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto and Tokyo, Japan 1982.

Her work is held in a number of collections including: Contemporary Art Society for Wales, National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh and Whitworth Art Gallery, University of Manchester

Eleri has also been represented in the SOFA Sculpture, Objects and Functional Art fair in New York and Chicago and the Collect Craft Fair in Saatchi Gallery, London.

She was artist in residence at Sanskriti Kendra, Dehi, and research trip to India supported by Wales Arts International in 2016 and Teachers College, Columbia University, New York in 2012.

Photograhper: Toril Brancher

Alter Ego 1, 2015

Photograph, wearing a hand crocheted balaclava

“My grandmother taught me to crochet as a child during long hot summers on the Canadian prairies. Crochet is something I have always enjoyed doing but have kept separate from my art practice; it was a way of relaxing, making gifts for friends but definitely not “Art”.

Although some deny its continued existence, there remains a hierarchy in the art world; craft processes rank lower than disciplines such as video or sculpture. This extends even further; amongst crafts, textiles are one of the least well regarded. This highlights issues of gender and value. Textiles are “feminine”, often made by women, and part of the domestic sphere. There are many artists using craft materials and making art that is deserving of (and occasionally receiving) recognition, but this does not mean that this debate is no longer relevant. Prejudice against the “feminine” continues to be pervasive and used to dismiss these works of art. The debasement of craft is yet another method of the continued marginalisation of women in the art world.

In my practice, I deal with domestic materials. I transform inexpensive and accessible materials (often textiles) into performance, sculpture and installation. I show my artwork in both craft galleries and art galleries; I am called both an artist and a maker. However, assessing my practice a couple of years ago, I identified a frustration; a feeling that I needed to diminish my craft links in order to further access the art world. Obtusely, I decided to embrace a skill I had always hidden away – crochet.

Alter Ego I is a photograph of myself wearing a crocheted balaclava. Incorporating craft, textiles and a feminine perspective it epitomises my practice. It is also battle mask, to bolster my courage to stand up for these attributes in opposition to an invalid hierarchy.”

 

Alana Tyson is a Welsh-Canadian artist. Born in Canada, she graduated from the Alberta College of Art And Design in 2006, with a BFA (Hons) degree in Painting. She moved to the UK In 2007 and currently lives in North Wales.

Significant recent exhibitions by Alana Tyson include Crafting Anatomies: Materials, Performance, Identity, Bonington Gallery, Nottingham (2015); Decision Time, Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee (2014); Scythia 10 International Textiles Biennale, Kherson Ukraine (2014); Shades by the Seaside, Bathing Machine Intervention, Llawn02 Festival, Llandudno (2014), Power In the Land, a project responding to the decommissioning of the last nuclear reactor in Wales, which will tour the UK in 2016/17. She is supported by Mark Devereux Projects (2016/17).

Tyson was the recipient of the Ignac And Karla Herskovic Memorial Scholarship (2006), and has received support from the Alberta Foundation for The Arts (2006), an Artist Bursary (2013), and the Arts Council Of Wales (2013, 2014/15). In 2015 she was artist in resident at Ruthin Craft Centre in Wales.

 

Photograph: courtesy of the artist

Thursday 12 October 2017, 6-7.30pm

Siri Hustvedt: The Summer Without Men

Alongside Oriel Myrddin Gallery’s exhibition A Darker Thread // Edefyn Tywyllach  we will be reading Siri Hustvedt’s The Summer Without Men, chosen for us by the exhibition curator, Laura Thomas. A tale that starts with a faltering 30 year marriage and includes a cast of characters including Abigail who embroiders and appliques craft works with subversive undertones…

‘A rich and intelligent meditation on female identity, written in beguiling lyrical prose…heady and intoxicating.’ Lucy Scholes, Sunday Times

‘It’s an astoundingly joyful read…a book that shines with intellectual curiosity and emotional integrity…every page reminds us that, as Mia’s doctor tells her, “tolerating cracks is part of being alive.’ Justine Jordon, The Guardian

Join us for a friendly discussion led by Kirsten Hinks Knight.

Free entry, tea and cake provided.

 

To accompany our A Darker Thread // Edefyn Tywyllach exhibition, we’ve asked our own Siân Conti to be our Pinterest Guest Pinner from July – October 2017.

If you’re a regular to Oriel Myrddin Gallery you will know Siân – she started with us in 1993, that’s 24 years ago…it’s a bit like ‘Hotel California’ here (but in a good way!)

Siân was trained in Dyfed College of Art in Carmarthen through a four year course in Fashion Design (1976 – 80). After graduating she worked in various roles; Junior Designer at Morris Cohen  in Port Talbot, Assistant Designer and Pattern Cutter for Welsh Brides in Cardigan and then with Jamie and Jessie Seaton Knitwear (Toast)in Llanfynnydd. For 10 years she was the wardrobe genius behind Merlin Youth Theatre in Carmarthen “…creating and making costumes for zillions of youth Members…well perhaps not, but it was an awful lot!”. You can see from this very charming photograph that Siân started early on her dressmaking career!

Siân is Oriel Myrddin Gallery’s resident textiles expert and we’re very lucky to have her…so enjoy her pins for the next few months…we can’t wait to see what she finds!

Saturday 19 August 2017, 11am-4pm

You will learn how to create and maintain a simple non-toxic indigo recipe which you can re-create at home. The recipe will enable you to dye plant fibres such as cotton and linen. You will also learn various pattern making techniques inspired by traditional Nigerian resist dyeing to create your own beautiful indigo dyed textile samples which you can take home and use for your own projects.

 

Cost: £25 includes materials

Suitable for age 16+

Booking Essential

Please bring an apron or wear old clothes, a pair of rubber gloves and some plastic bags to take the samples home.

Friday 18 August 2017, 7pm

Gallery talk by Lucille Junkere: The Yoruba Blues – The art of indigo dyeing in Nigeria

Textile artist Lucille Junkere returns to the gallery to talk about her indigo dyeing journey since her residency at the William Morris Gallery. She recently travelled to Nigeria through a Winston Churchill Fellowship where she studied indigo dyeing techniques amongst Yoruba artisans. Àdíre is the Yoruba word for the resist dyed cloth made in Yoruba towns in Nigeria. The textile functions both as an aesthetic expression and a means of communication, offering a deep insight into Yoruba religion, culture, folklore and history. Her talk with be illustrated with short videos, photography, music and Lucille’s own indigo work.

 

Admission Free

Saturday 15 July 2pm: Exhibition opening by lecturer and artist, Angela Maddock

Sunday 23 July 11am – 1pm: Sketchbook Walk with Suzi Park at the National Wool Museum, Drefach Felindre – free, open to all, no need to book

Friday 18 August 7 – 8pm: The Yoruba Blues – The art of indigo dyeing in Nigeria – talk with textile artist Lucille Junkere – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 19 Awst 10:30am – 4pm: Pattern making with indigo inspired by Nigerian resist textiles known as Àdíre – workshop with textile artist Lucille Junkere – age 16+, booking essential: £25

Saturday 9 September 11am – 1pm: Sketchbook Walk with Julia Griffiths Jones at The Welsh Quilt Centre, Lampeter Town Hall, SA48 7BB  – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 9 September 3pm: A Darker Thread: Curator’s Talk  – with Laura Thomas – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 23 September 11am: Weaving Wales  – talk with author of Woollen Mills of Wales, a new book by Branwen Davies – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 7 October 10am – 4pm: The Big Draw: Extreme Weaving – with Laura Thomas at the National Wool Museum, Drefach Felindre – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 7 October 11am: A Well Spun Yarn: Tales of ThreadWise Thinking – artist talk with Angela Maddock – free, open to all, no need to book

Saturday 7 October 1 – 4pm: Filling Holes: A workshop on visible mending with thread – workshop with Angela Maddock – age 16+, booking essential: £25

 

Featured Maker: Stephen R Hughes

The Back Wall Series: Eleri Mills

15 July – 21 October 2017 – in the gallery shop

All work is for sale – Collectorplan interest free credit scheme is available

 

A Darker Thread Showcase @ Mission Gallery

27 June – 6 August 2017
Spike Dennis & Rhiannon Williams

Showcase of selected artists from: A Darker Thread

Mission Gallery, Gloucester Place, Swansea SA1 1TY

Closing Date : 30th July, 2017.

Cultural Services – Oriel Myrddin

Arts Education & Research Officer (Temporary Maternity Leave cover for 6 months in the first instance)
22.5 hours per week

£20,661* – £24,174* (Grade F) *Pro-rata

We are looking to appoint an individual to facilitate, deliver and develop, in conjunction with Oriel Myrddin’s Gallery Manager, education provision that enhances Oriel Myrddin’s exhibition programme to Primary & Secondary Schools, and Colleges in Carmarthenshire.

The ability to communicate effectively in Welsh is required to accomplish this post. Support can be provided on appointment to reach this level

For an informal discussion please contact Catherine Spring on 01267 224833.

 

Off Site Projects

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